Legislation

Current Federal Legislation:

H.R. 58

(Scalise, Boren):

This bill would: allow an individual to purchase any firearm from a federal firearms licensee (FFL) in another state by going to his place of business -– thereby extending provisions currently applying only to rifles and shotguns and

  • require such an interstate sale to comply with both the law of the state in which the transaction occurs and the law of the state where the buyer resides;
  • extend these interstate sales provisions to FFL’s at gun shows;
  • allow a serviceman to claim residence in (1) his state of legal residence, (2) the state where he’s permanently stationed, AND (3) the state where he resides and commutes to the place where he’s stationed.

H.R. 77

(Jackson Lee):

This bill would authorize $150,000,000 a year (forever) to hire Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) personnel to police guns at the border.

H.R. 126

(Gingrey, Bachmann, Bartlett, Bishop, Blackburn, Burton, Carter, Conaway, Franks, Gohmert, Sam Johnson, Kline, Marchant, Paul, Roe, Rogers, Ross, Westmoreland, Young):

In determining that a gun was, for example, a full automatic, this bill would require the ATF to make a videotape of its testing and make it available to interested parties.

H.R. 224

(Jackson Lee):

This bill would expand federal hate crime laws, including a provision allowing a person to be sentenced up to life imprisonment if a gun is involved.

H.R. 227

(Jackson Lee):

This bill would:

  • amend 18 U.S.C. 922(x) — making it difficult to legally teach your kids the safe and effective use of firearms — by extending the subsection’s labyrinthine provisions concerning handguns to semiautos (and semiauto clips) and to persons less than 21 (rather than 18), with certain exceptions;
  • increase the penalties for violating 18 U.S.C. 922(x) to five years generally, but ten years in some circumstances;
  • enhance lock-up-your-safety provisions (1) to provide for a three year prison sentence if you keep a loaded gun in your home for self-defense and a child gains access to it and causes serious bodily injury; (2)to allow $10,000 civil penalties for gun dealers who fail to comply with lock-up-your safety requirements;
  • provide that it is “child abandonment” to allow your kid to be unaccompanied at a gun show (even to go to the bathroom);
  • provide for grants for “gun safety programs.”

H.R. 263

(Ackerman):

This bill would override McClure-Volkmer and would prohibit an FFL subject to license revocation from transferring any of his inventory.

H.R. 308

(McCarthy and 48 others):

This is the semiautomatic magazine ban. It would prohibit private transfers of magazines holding more than 10 rounds, even if they were grandfathered.

H.R. 324

(Filner):

This bill would, among other things, allow military law enforcement personnel to carry firearms.

H.R. 367

(Richardson):

This bill would make it a ten-year felony to “knowingly” carry a firearm within 250 feet of a building where you “know” a member of Congress is. Thus, the bill would create an incomprehensible series of moving “no-gun” zones. And while, for example, you would be exempted for a gun in your house, if you lived next door to a congressman, you could not carry your gun to your car parked on the street.

H.R. 420

(Rehberg, Boswell):

This bill would establish a 90-day “amnesty” period for NFA firearms (like automatics) held by a veteran or his family.

H.R. 496

(King of New York, Bishop, Engel, Rangel, Chu):

This bill would make it a ten-year felony to “knowingly” carry a firearm within 1,000 feet of a building where you “know” a member of Congress is. Thus, the bill would create an incomprehensible series of moving “no-gun” zones. And while, for example, you would be exempted for a gun in your house, if you lived next door to a congressman, you could not carry your gun to your car parked on the street.

H.R. 505

(Nadler):

This bill would create a new class of “prohibited persons” consisting of persons convicted of a “misdemeanor sex offense against a minor.” It is hard to imagine what sex crime against a minor would be so insignificant that it would be classified as a misdemeanor, but the most likely example would be, in some states, kid-on-kid sex.

H.R. 591

(McCarthy):

This is the gun show ban. It would provide for comprehensive and open-ended regulation and inspection of gun shows. But, more importantly, it would create a two-year prison sentence for any gun show sponsor who failed to notify EVERY attendee of his responsibilities under the Brady Law. No sane person would sponsor a gun show under these circumstances. In addition, the bill would significantly increase criminal sentences for recordkeeping violations by FFL’s or for Brady Law violations.

H.R. 615

(Lummis, Donnelly, Rehberg, Broun, Miller, Carter, King of Iowa, Ross, Bishop):

This bill would allow curios and relics to be imported into the U.S. without the approval of the Department of State or the Department of Defense.

H.R. 645

(Ross, Jordan):

This bill would repeal the D.C. gun ban. It would prohibit D.C. from adopting new anti-gun laws. It would: (1) turn the semiauto ban into a full auto ban; (2) repeal registration requirements and ammunition bans; (3) specifically reiterate the Supreme Court’s guarantee of the right to defend your home, although it would not allow concealed carry and would broadly authorize D.C. to prohibit guns in “sensitive” public places.

H.R. 770

(Cuellar):

This bill would establish a “Border Enforcement Security Task Force.”

H.R. 808

(Kucinich et al.):

This bill would establish a Department of Peace.

H.R. 822

(Stearns):

This bill would grant national reciprocity (with the exception of Vermont, Wisconsin, and Illinois) to persons with a concealed carry license. Unlike some versions of this proposal, however, it is not “Vermont-friendly” with respect to states which do not require licenses for concealed carry.

H.R. 826

(Carter, Doggett):

This bill would require Active Shooter Training for personnel performing security functions on military reservations.

S. 32

(Lautenberg, Feinstein, Menendez, Boxer, Kerry, Reed, Levin, Franken, Schumer, Durbin):

This is the Senate version of the semiautomatic magazine ban. It would prohibit private transfers of magazines holding more than 10 rounds, even if they were grandfathered.

S. 34

(Lautenberg, Menendez, Feinstein, Whitehouse, Reed, Levin, Schumer, Durbin, Boxer):

This bill would allow the Attorney General to prohibit you from owning firearms by placing your name on a “watch list” and notifying you of that fact. The Attorney General doesn’t need to tell you (or a court to which you appeal your disability) the basis for the loss of your gun rights (other than summaries and “redacted” documents which can be submitted to the court). We have seen other statutes — notably the Brady Law — under which you are supposedly given the statutory right to appeal your gun ban, and our experience in those cases has been that ATF frequently just ignores them.

S. 35

(Lautenberg, Reed, Menendez, Kerry, Feinstein, Whitehouse, Levin, Schumer, Durbin, Boxer, Wyden):

This is the Senate version of the gun show ban. It would provide for comprehensive and open-ended regulation and inspection of gun shows. But, more importantly, it would create a two-year prison sentence for any gun show sponsor who failed to notify EVERY attendee of his responsibilities under the Brady Law. No sane person would sponsor a gun show under these circumstances. In addition, the bill would significantly increase criminal sentences for recordkeeping violations by FFL’s or for Brady Law violations.

S. 176

(Boxer):

This bill would require every state issuing a concealed carry permit to comply with federal standards for that permit, including “demonstrat[ing] good cause for requesting a concealed firearm permit; and … demonstrat[ing] that the applicant is worthy of the public trust…”

S. 332

(Hatch, Roberts):

This bill is Senator Orrin Hatch’s stab at immigration reform. It allows enhanced penalties for the “possession” of firearms in connection with drug offenses. The Second Amendment community has opposed this effort to punish the “possession” of a firearm, without any evidence of its use or brandishing.

S. 436

(Schumer, Gillibrand):

This is an effort to embody Barack Obama’s Arizona newspaper article into legislation — and to milk political advantage from the tragedy in Tucson. It would:

  • withhold federal crime-fighting funds from states which fail to provide a sufficient number of names to the FBI’s Instantcheck system (with penalties possible for states that fall as little as 10% short of providing all names [sec. 101];
  • require federal agencies to turn over the names of all prohibited persons (which would presumably include the names of all persons admitting to having smoked as little as one marijuana cigarette) [sec. 102];
  • redefine “adjudicated as a mental defective” (18 U.S.C. 922(g)(4)) to impose a gun ban in any case in which a “lawful authority” (including, presumably, a school or a Medicare-funded doctor) prescribes counseling or medication in response to “subnormal intelligence, mental illness, or incompetency” [sec. 103];
  • require colleges to set up a procedure for investigating students who are acting strange and “reporting” them [sec. 103]; -allow a person to be put on the FBI’s drug abuser list if, among other things, he admitted to “possessing a controlled substance unlawfully within the last five years” (thereby, humorously, removing current law’s theoretical gun ban for large numbers of unadmitted pot smokers) [sec.104];
  • ban all private person-to-person sales of firearms, requiring that all sales go through federal firearms licensees or the police, who would conduct a background check [Title II]

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Current State of Michigan Legislation:

2011 House Bill 4439 (Expand CPL “gun free zone” to libraries )

  • Introduced by Rep. Joan Bauer (D) on March 15, 2011, to expand the “gun free zone” provision of the concealed pistol permit law to include public libraries.

2011 House Bill 4438 (Expand CPL “gun free zone” to libraries )

  • Introduced by Rep. Joan Bauer (D) on March 15, 2011, to expand the “gun free zone” provision of the concealed pistol permit law to include public libraries.

2011 House Bill 4435 (Revise “gun free zone” CPL exception )

  • Introduced in the House on March 15, 2011, to revise the “gun free zone” provision of the concealed pistol permit law to exempt retired county sheriff corrections officers with concealed pistol licenses from the restrictions.

2011 House Bill 4247 (Lower pistol length definition to 26 inches )

  • Introduced by Rep. Douglas Geiss (D) on February 15, 2011, to “grandfather” the pistol registrations of individuals who registered a long gun less than 30 inches as a pistol. House Bills 4124 and 4125 would change the law defining a pistol as a firearm less than 30 inches in length, to make this less than 26 inches. Some rifles with folding stocks are less than 30 inches, and so under Michigan law technically are subject to the same purchase and other restrictions as pistols.

2011 Senate Bill 59 (Move CPL issuance to Secretary of State )

  • Introduced by Sen. Michael Green (R) on January 25, 2011, to eliminate county concealed weapon licensing boards, and transfer the responsibility for issuing concealed pistol license (CPL) licenses to the Secretary of State.

2011 Senate Bill 30 (Allow CPL holders to keep and bear tasers )

  • Introduced by Sen. Rick Jones (R) on January 19, 2011, to revise various provisions of the state concealed pistol permit law to also allow permit holders to keep and bear tasers, subject to the same regulations and restrictions as concealed pistols.

2011 Senate Bill 29 (Allow CPL holders to keep and bear tasers )

  • Introduced by Sen. Goeff Hansen (R) on January 19, 2011, to revise various provisions of the state concealed pistol permit law to also allow permit holders to keep and bear tasers, subject to the same regulations and restrictions as concealed pistols.

2011 Senate Bill 28 (Allow CPL holders to keep and bear tasers )

  • Introduced by Sen. Goeff Hansen (R) on January 19, 2011, to revise various provisions of the state concealed pistol permit law to also allow permit holders to keep and bear tasers, subject to the same regulations and restrictions as concealed pistols.

2011 House Bill 4126 (Lower pistol length definition to 26 inches )

  • Introduced by Rep. Douglas Geiss (D) on January 20, 2011, to change the law defining any firearm less than 30 inches in length as a “pistol,” making this 26 inches. Some rifles with folding stocks are less than 30 inches, and so under Michigan law are technically subject to the same purchase and other restrictions as pistols.

2011 House Bill 4125 (Lower pistol length definition to 26 inches )

  • Introduced by Rep. Douglas Geiss (D) on January 20, 2011, to change the law defining any firearm less than 30 inches in length as a “pistol,” making this 26 inches. Some rifles with folding stocks are less than 30 inches, and so under Michigan law are technically subject to the same purchase and other restrictions as pistols.

2011 House Bill 4124 (Lower pistol length definition to 26 inches )

  • Introduced by Rep. Douglas Geiss (D) on January 20, 2011, to change the law defining a pistol as a firearm less than 30 inches in length, to make this less than 26 inches. Some rifles with folding stocks are less than 30 inches, and so under Michigan law technically are subject to the same purchase and other restrictions as pistols.

2011 House Bill 4010 (Repeal CPL “gun-free zone” provision )

  • Introduced by Rep. Richard LeBlanc (D) on January 13, 2011, to revise sentencing guidelines to reflect the repeal proposed by House Bill 4009 of the “gun free zone” provision of the concealed pistol permit law.

2011 House Bill 4009 (Repeal concealed pistol “gun-free zone” provision )

  • Introduced by Rep. Richard LeBlanc (D) on January 13, 2011, to repeal the “gun-free zone” provision of the concealed pistol permit law, which prohibits those who have received a permit after meeting the background check and training requirements, from carrying a pistol in schools, day care facilities, sports stadiums or arenas, bars, bar/restaurants, places of worship, college dorms and classrooms, hospitals, casinos, entertainment facilities that hold more than 2,500, and courts.

2010 House Bill 6404 (Exempt railroad police officers from CPL )

  • Introduced by Rep. Sarah Roberts (D) on August 25, 2010, to exempt railroad police officers from the requirement to get a Concealed Pistol Permit (CPL) in order to carry a concealed pistol.

2010 House Bill 6403 (Exempt railroad police officers from CPL )

  • Introduced by Rep. Dian Slavens (D) on August 25, 2010, to exempt railroad police officers from the requirement to get a Concealed Pistol Permit (CPL) in order to carry a concealed pistol.

2010 House Bill 6393 (Revise “gun free zone” CPL exception )

  • Introduced by Rep. Rick Jones (R) on August 23, 2010, to revise the “gun free zone” provision of the concealed pistol permit law to exempt state corrections officers with concealed pistol licenses from the restrictions.

2010 House Bill 6382 (Clarify CPL law detail )

  • Introduced by Rep. David Agema (R) on August 19, 2010, to clarify that the state concealed pistol license law allows a licensee to carry more than one pistol at a time.